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Wild Tracks! A Guide to Nature's Footprints

There are 9 videos in this category and 0 videos in 0 subcategories.

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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 6 - 10
1442 Views:
Wild Tracks! A Guide to Nature's Footprints
From WatchKnow, produced by WatchKnowLearn
This video version of Wild Tracks! A Guide to Nature's Footprints by Jim Arnosky includes text, narration, and pictures.  The book is listed on the CoreStandards.org website as part of the suggested reading material for grades 2-3.  (10:30)
March 6, 2012 at 09:40 AM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 5 - 18
506 Views:
What Is Foot Morphology in Animal Tracking?
From ehow.com
This is one in a series of videos about animal tracking from walnuthilltracking.com.  In this video learn what foot morphology is and why it is important to tracking animals. (01:47)
April 30, 2012 at 04:13 PM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 5 - 18
501 Views:
How to Track Birds
From ehow.com
This is one in a series of videos about animal tracking from walnuthilltracking.com.  In this video, learn how to track different bird tracks.  (01:48)
April 30, 2012 at 04:11 PM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: unspecified
501 Views:
Video: What Is Animal Tracking? (gallops)
From ehow.com
This is one in a series of videos about animal tracking.  In this video, the narrators explain how to spot a galloping pattern in animal tracks (02:27).
April 30, 2012 at 02:51 PM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: unspecified
481 Views:
References for Animal Tracking
From ehow.com
This is one in a series of videos about animal tracking from walnuthilltracking.com.  In this video learn about how to use what animals leave behind to help track as well as get valuable references about tracking.  (02:45)
April 30, 2012 at 04:16 PM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: unspecified
480 Views:
How to Read Trail Widths in Animal Tracking
From ehow.com
This is a video in a series of videos about animal tracking.  This one explains how to read a trail width to determine the what animal left the tracks.  (01:45)
April 30, 2012 at 03:03 PM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 5 - 18
466 Views:
How to Track Dogs & Cats
From ehow.com
This is one in a series of videos about animal tracking from walnuthilltracking.com.  In this video, learn how to spot the difference between feline (cat) and canine (dog) tracks.  (02:27)
April 30, 2012 at 04:08 PM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 5 - 12
582 Views:
Animal Tracks
From YouTube
This is a short explanation of how to observe animal tracks in the wild and show some common tracks such as deer, possum, and raccoon. (0:52)
March 8, 2012 at 09:33 PM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 5 - 11
598 Views:
Common Animal Tracks
From YouTube
A naturalist from the SUNY College of Environmental Forestry discusses Common Animal Tracks.  This clip shows many types of tracks in the snow and the narrator talks about the animals and their habitats.  Unfortunately, the video does not have a high... [more]
March 8, 2012 at 09:15 PM
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