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Sentence Fragments

Recognize and avoid sentence fragments.

There are 9 videos in this category and 0 videos in 0 subcategories.

Category Videos
Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 8 - 18
3942 Views:
The Sentence Fragments Song
From YouTube
This clip was made as a grammar project for English class. It is a very creative song about sentence fragments.  The lyrics in the song say that sentence fragments being an dependent clause that doesn't have a subject or a verb for its cause.  Guitar... [more]
February 7, 2010 at 11:08 AM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 10 - 18
1273 Views:
Recognizing A Fragment
From YouTube, produced by tutormania.net
This video focuses on sentence skills.  The tutor will give tips to help figure out whether a sentence is truly a complete sentence. Examples of multiple-choice questions are shown as text with options to choose from to answer the questions about fra... [more]
February 7, 2010 at 11:23 AM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 9 - 18
2963 Views:
Comma Splice, Sentence Fragment, and Run-on Sentences Slide Show
From YouTube, produced by Tanner Maclean
Musical slide show that discusses comma spice, sentence fragments, and run on sentences.  Definitions and examples are give for each.
February 7, 2010 at 11:35 AM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 9 - 18
967 Views:
Fragments
From YouTube
This video teaches about fragments through definitions and examples.(1:41)
October 26, 2011 at 12:37 AM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 9 - 18
1227 Views:
How to Make Sentence Fragments Into Complete Thoughts
From YouTube
A musical clip about sentence fragments.  Scrolling text on the screen shows examples of sentence fragments and asks the viewer if they are complete sentences.  Segment fragments is defined and the examples are edited to make them complete thoughts.
February 7, 2010 at 11:13 AM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 9 - 18
1544 Views:
Sentences Versus and Sentence Fragment
From YouTube, produced by Wordcraft 2
Learn about distinguishing between a sentence versus a sentence fragment. The five features of a sentence are shown as text on the screen.   Examples of complete sentences are shown and viewers are asked why they are complete sentences.
February 7, 2010 at 11:30 AM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 12 - 18
1077 Views:
Rules to Avoid Sentence Fragments
From YouTube, produced by English 50
An English teacher discusses what sentence fragments are.  Fragments are word groups that are not complete sentences.  They require a subject and a verb to make them complete.  Examples are presented from an English text book to help avoid sentence f... [more]
February 7, 2010 at 11:19 AM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 10 - 18
735 Views:
Workshop 1 Sentence Fragments Clip 2
From YouTube
The 2nd part of this teacher's lecture on fragments, subordinating conjunctions, and (7:33)
October 26, 2011 at 12:56 AM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 10 - 18
659 Views:
Workshop 1: Sentence Fragments Clip 1
From YouTube
A teacher lead lecture on fragments.  She also discusses independent and dependent clauses, subject and verb, and complete thoughts. (7:44)
October 26, 2011 at 12:47 AM
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