47,710,803 Videos Watched

Age Filter: Click to Set

Embed Video
Embed Video:
URL of source video:
Simply give the URL and we will get the embed code automatically, if we support embedding from the site.
Directory

Brain Disease and Injury

There are 7 videos in this category and 5 videos in 2 subcategories.

Category Videos
Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 16 - 18
745 Views:
Alzheimer's Disease
From learner.org, produced by PBS
When this program was first filmed, Eleanor, age 51, was in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. This module follows Eleanor’s physical and mental decline after the initial filming. Pathology in the brainstem and other regions in the brains of Al... [more]
March 9, 2010 at 08:26 PM
  • Favorites

The following are unrated. Please help by rating them!
Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 16 - 18
1925 Views:
Frontal Lobes and Behavior: The Story of Phineas Gage
From learner.org, produced by PBS
This module relates the story of Phineas Gage, whose name appears in virtually every general psychology textbook. After a heavy metal rod was blown through his temporal lobe, Phineas experienced dramatic mental change. The study of the trauma and its... [more]
March 9, 2010 at 08:34 PM
  • Favorites

Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 16 - 18
916 Views:
Brain Anomaly and Plasticity: Hydrocephalus
From learner.org, produced by PBS
Hydrocephalus, a childhood disorder of excess fluid in the brain, illustrates brain plasticity — the brain’s amazing ability to rebound after injury. While patients with this disorder experience compression and destruction of brain tissue early in li... [more]
March 9, 2010 at 08:03 PM
  • Favorites

Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 16 - 18
850 Views:
Multiple Personality
From learner.org, produced by PBS
Tony, walking down a country road, is shown talking to himself about his multiple personalities. Dr. Frances Howland of the Yale University School of Medicine describes Tony’s case, and viewers are shown Tony’s therapy sessions as different personali... [more]
March 9, 2010 at 08:32 PM
  • Favorites

Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 16 - 18
824 Views:
Huntington's Disease
From learner.org, produced by PBS
Dr. Nancy Wexler of the Hereditary Disease Foundation and Columbia University recounts her research on the demographics, symptoms, and genetic cause of this debilitating illness. The module also explores ethical and moral dimensions of DNA testing, w... [more]
March 9, 2010 at 08:17 PM
  • Favorites

Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 16 - 18
802 Views:
Understanding the Brain Through Epilepsy
From learner.org, produced by PBS
In the midst of a young boy’s epileptic seizure, Dr. Fritz Dreifuss describes what is happening to him on a medical level. He explains that a lack of adequate inhibitory neurotransmitter function leads to an “electrical storm” in the brain. Different... [more]
March 9, 2010 at 08:42 PM
  • Favorites

Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 16 - 18
789 Views:
Autism
From learner.org, produced by PBS
This module opens with statistics and a description of autism and how the disorder has been viewed historically. Studies now support the theory that autism results from a lack of normal neural growth during prenatal development. Dr. Temple Grandin of... [more]
March 9, 2010 at 08:41 PM
  • Favorites
History [show]


Loading history...

Comments
Please make your comments on categories positive, and not just negative.

People work hard on educational categories, and we want to encourage them to make more!

  • Profanity (curse words), sexually suggestive remarks, and other such obviously inappropriate comments will be deleted immediately, and are grounds for immediate expulsion. Remember, children use this website.
  • Personal criticism on project forums and in video content is not allowed and will be deleted immediately. Any violations of this rule could result in expulsion from the project so please, no insults or other negative personal remarks.
  • Very harshly-worded criticism of content will also be deleted promptly. Please use your vote to express your harshest feelings. Repeated violations of this rule can result in expulsion. If you must criticize another person's hard work, then be nice about it.
If you want to comment, please sign in
Reason:  

  Cancel

Share