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Dog Bless You - Animal Shelters
From YouTube, produced by explore.org
In the United States alone, as many as ten million animals enter shelters each year and millions must be euthanized due to lack of space. How can you help? Explore visits the Animal Shelter of Wood River Valley -- the first no kill shelter in Idaho -- and finds out how the shelter staff rescues, protects, and finds homes for abandoned dogs and cats. Run time 06:29.
 
Found by JonDonCole in Animals
July 1, 2010 at 07:45 PM
 
Ages: 9 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4881   
 
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Applying for US Citizenship Part 4 of 4
From YouTube
Debby Alter from JFVS gives detailed instructions on how to apply for United States Citizenship. Part 4 of 4 (09:10)
 
Found by Laurie1112 in Government, Politics, and Civics
September 27, 2011 at 01:42 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4876   
 
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Competing Alliances of World War II
From watchmojo.com, produced by WatchMojo.com
The Second World War was basically a battle between the Axis Powers and the Allied Forces for control of the world. Comprising the Axis were Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Germany, Benito Mussolini’s fascist Italy and Hirohito’s Japan. The Allies initially were Britain, France and Poland; however, when the United States was eventually drawn into the war that country also fought for this side. In Part 3 of our series on WWII, WatchMojo.com finds out who was fighting whom during the Second World War. (3:35)
 
Found by CourtneyMorrison in Historical Overview of World War II
March 28, 2012 at 08:26 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4873   
 
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Weird US: The Curse of Lake Ronkonkoma
From YouTube, produced by History Channel
Video discuss the history and mystery of Lake Ronkonkoma and its history. The lake is the largest and deepest lake in Long Island. This video discusses the curse the lake has. Video is good quality and has good information for students studying this area of the United States.
 
Found by Barb in New York
August 7, 2009 at 02:37 PM
 
Ages: 8 - 14     License: Undetermined
 
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   Views: 4801    Comments: 1
 
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Nativism and Racism
From hippocampus.org, produced by University of California
Beginning in 1920, immigration into the United States once again increased dramatically. Approximately 110,000 people immigrated to the U.S. in 1919, and that number increased to more than 430,000 in 1920 and more than 800,000 in 1921. And as before, many native-born Americans saw the immigrants as a threat to their livelihood and their image of America. Congress, reacting to this widespread sentiment, passed the Emergency Quota Act of 1921.
Under this act, a new quota system would stem the influx of foreign-born citizens into the United States. The number of immigrants allowed to enter America for any given county was limited to three percent of the number of immigrants from that country already living in the United States as defined by the census of 1910. To further restrict immigration, in 1924 Congress adjusted the quota system so it was based on the census of 1890 when few southern Europeans had arrived. (Video is narrated with slides and speeches.)
 
Found by helpingnorth in Between the World Wars(1920-1940)
December 7, 2009 at 09:38 PM
 
Ages: 14 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4765   
 
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The Industrial Revolution
From YouTube
The innovations that marked the transition of the world from an agricultural community to an industrial one started in 18th century England. The Industrial Revolution quickly spread through Europe and the United States.  The people behind the Industrial Revolution were ingenious and clever. They sparked an era of experimentation and creativity that has not yet ceased in modern times. Learn about the struggles and triumphs that led the world to the discovery of the steam engine, the automobile, and the computer.  Video is of good quality.  Video is appropriate for students of middle elementary school.
 
Found by Barb in Industrial Revolution
August 12, 2009 at 07:39 PM
 
Ages: 9 - 14     License: Undetermined
 
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   Views: 4732   
 
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Battle of Fort Necessity
From vimeo.com, produced by vimeo
Battle of Jumonville Glen. This "battle" was one of the most important ones because it was the battle that started the French and Indian War, which then lead to the American Revolution and the creation of the United States of America. The video explains how this battle happened from both the French and British viewpoints. An excellent video to show students the "fog of war" during a battle as well as cause and effect. (04:22)
 
Found by freealan in Causes of the Revolution
September 24, 2011 at 12:54 PM
 
Ages: 13 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4726   
 
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Juvenile Court: A Judge's Guide for Young Adults and Their Parents, Book Trailer
From YouTube, produced by M2Productions
Each year, there are over 100,000 teens cited to court in Los Angeles County, United States, alone.  Juvenile Court: A Judge's Guide for Young Adults and Their Parents uses real-life examples to show the court process.  What happens when we don't follow the rules?  The book includes tools to prepare for your court hearing. Music: "Roxxsteady" by the Noisemakers.  (01:30)
 
Found by Mary Alice Deveny in Law
June 6, 2010 at 04:34 PM
 
Ages: 11 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4650   
 
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The Articles of Confederation Weaknesses: Why Constitution Needed
From history.com
After several failed attempts at creating a government, a 1787 convention is called to draft a new legal system for the United States. This new Constitution
provides for increased federal authority while still protecting the basic rights of its citizens.
 
Found by freealan in The Confederation
September 19, 2010 at 12:00 AM
 
Ages: 8 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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   Views: 4569   
 
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We Didn't Start the Fire
From teachertube.com
This music video gives a very brief history of the United States.  The original song "We Didn't Start the Fire" is playing while various pictures are shown on the screen.  Pictures are labed with the person/event and date. This video might be a nice introduction to the beginning of a class/unit on US History. Run time 04:44.
 
Found by begamatt in Overviews of U.S. History
August 7, 2010 at 12:38 PM
 
Ages: 13 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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   Views: 4488   
 
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The Tariff of 1828
From hippocampus.org, produced by University of California
This video is accompanied by text. "Andrew Jackson was elected as President of the United States because the American people saw him as the “everyman.” His leadership during the Battle of New Orleans in 1819 gave him the respect of wealthy businessmen, and his simple roots resonated with those who were struggling to carve their own niche. However, his popularity did not ensure that he would avoid scandal and resentment during his presidency.
Jackson’s supporters, angry over John Quincy Adams’ win in the 1824 election, strategized to sabotage his presidency..."
 
Found by helpingnorth in The Age of Jackson 1828-1848
December 23, 2009 at 05:56 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4462   
 
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Face of America: The Ellis Island Immigration Museum
From snagfilms.com, produced by Marc Doyle
More than 100 million Americans can trace their ancestry to New York's Ellis Island.Between 1897 and 1938, immigration changed the face of America. More than 100 million citizens in the United States can trace their ancestry to an immigrant who landed at New York’s Ellis Island. Ellis Island is more than a museum, it is hallowed ground; it is the place where many immigrants from all over the world first touched American soil. Through the museum’s oral history project and through the everyday objects on display--a pair of boots, a cooking pot, religious artifacts and traditional clothing--the museum strives to “give voice” to people whose lives have not typically been seen as history. (29:25)
 
Found by Mrs Jefferies in Historical Sites and Museums
September 5, 2011 at 12:10 AM
 
Ages: 10 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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American Experience: Influenza 1918
From pbs.org, produced by PBS
Influenza 1918 is the story of the worst epidemic the United States has ever known. Before it was over, the flu would kill more than 600,000 Americans - more than all the combat deaths of this century combined. (52:53)
 
Found by begamatt in Post Civil War Era (1875-1920)
February 7, 2011 at 06:51 PM
 
Ages: 11 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4397   
 
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US Marines Battle of Guadalcanal
From YouTube
Archival, newsreel-style documentary footage of the United States Marines’ participation in the Battle of Guadalcanal. It was fought between August 7, 1942, and February 7, 1943, in the Pacific theatre of World War II. This campaign, was fought on the sea, in the air and on the ground, pitted US Marines against Imperial Japanese forces and was a decisive, strategically significant campaign of World War II. (The term "Japs" may be offensive.)
 
Found by auntlee in Battle of Guadalcanal
July 11, 2009 at 07:11 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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   Views: 4382   
 
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The Missouri Compromise
From hippocampus.org, produced by University of California
This video is accompanied by text. "During the early nineteenth century, the sectional lines between the free north and the slave south were being gradually drawn. Slavery began to gain prominence as a national issue, and the South became solidly united behind the institution of slavery as it became more critical to their economic success. By 1819, the United States was comprised of an equal number of free and slave states—11 of each..."
 
Found by helpingnorth in Missouri Compromise
December 19, 2009 at 10:02 PM
 
Ages: 14 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4369   
 
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Fun Facts About Groundhogs!
From YouTube, produced by SciShow Kids
February 2nd is Groundhog Day in the United States, and Jessi and Squeaks are celebrating by sharing all kinds of amazing groundhog facts with us! Learn what groundhogs eat, where they live, and how they make it through tough winters! (03:44)
 
Found by teresahopson in Groundhog Day
January 31, 2018 at 06:47 PM
 
Ages: 7 - 15     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4295   
 
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The Squalid Side of the City
From hippocampus.org, produced by University of California
This is a video accompanied by text. "The population explosion and modern inventions turned the city, once friendly and familiar, into an impersonal megalopolis that segregated Americans by race, ethnicity, and social class. City residents discovered that with growth and advancement came grim consequences. Between 1866 and 1915, more than 25 million foreigners left their homelands for the United States. Millions of newcomers had little money, a limited understanding of the English language, and no friends, family, or acquaintances to greet them upon their arrival. Unlike the highly literate immigrants who bought land and started businesses in America decades earlier, the new immigrants were largely illiterate and willing to accept low paying industrial jobs in the city..."
 
Found by helpingnorth in Gilded Age
December 29, 2009 at 01:03 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4275   
 
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Serpent Mound
From teachertube.com, produced by Our Ohio
Serpent Mound is a massive earthwork depicting an uncoiling serpent and is the largest and finest effigy mound in the United States. Spanning nearly 1,300 feet in length, it is thought to be constructed by the Fort Ancient culture more than 1,000 years ago. Today, it is a National Historic Landmark.
 
Found by monteb in Ohio
May 24, 2010 at 04:13 PM
 
Ages: 6 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4265   
 
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U.S. Child Labor 1908-1920
From YouTube
A look at child labor in the early 20th century in the United States as represented through the photography of Lewis W. Hine. The film documents the use of child labor in industry. No audio. Run time 09:22
 
Found by nanna in Child Labor
April 14, 2009 at 12:55 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4260   
 
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'Revolutionary' CO2 Maps Zoom in on Greenhouse Gas Sources
From YouTube, produced by Purdue University
A new, high resolution, interactive map of United States carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels has found that the emissions aren't all where we thought. (04:53)
 
Found by Anonymous in Transportation Science
October 22, 2009 at 11:57 AM
 
Ages: 16 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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   Views: 4257   
 
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Steps to the Constitutional Convention
From criticalpast.com
The United States Constitution created at the Philadelphia Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was called because of the events listed here. A very good video in black and white. The many arguments and compromises are dealth with using both photos and movies.
 
Found by freealan in The Confederation
September 17, 2010 at 08:54 PM
 
Ages: 6 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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   Views: 4224   
 
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John and Abigail Adams
From biography.com, produced by Bio
This 43-minute biography uses actors, a narrator, and interviews to present a fairly complete view of these two remarkable people and their relationship as well as their contributions to history. During their courtship and marriage, John Adams and Abigail Smith Adams exchanged over 1,100 letters, many filled with intellectual discussions on government and politics considered an invaluable account of the Revolutionary War. Abigail, a fierce advocate of rights for women and African-Americans, was an important partner throughout John's political career. The couple lived on a farm in Quincy, Massachusetts, where they raised five children. Abigail died in 1818; John died in 1826, 16 months after their son, John Quincy Adams, was sworn in as the sixth President of the United States.
 
Found by freealan in 2nd John Adams
February 8, 2012 at 12:29 PM
 
Ages: 13 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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   Views: 4199   
 
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Carnivorous Plants of Texas
From pbslearningmedia.org, produced by Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
This video adapted from Texas Parks and Wildlife Department explores the bizarre world of carnivorous plants. More than 400 species of plants evolved structures and strategies for capturing, killing, and digesting insects and other creatures to satisfy their need for a scarce nutrient. This video highlights two types of carnivorous plants common to bogs of the southern United States. (02:01)
 
Found by begamatt in Carnivorous Plants
August 14, 2010 at 12:08 AM
 
Ages: 9 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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   Views: 4199   
 
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Chinese Immigrants - mid 1800s
From hippocampus.org, produced by University of California
This video is accompanied by text. "The discovery of gold in California in 1848 prompted people from all over the world to seek their fortunes on the Pacific Coast of the United States. The discovery came during a period of political turmoil and economic hardship in China. The Chinese Empire was losing control of the nation and imperial powers from Europe were forcing their way into the country. As a result, many Chinese left their homeland to make a living in America. They sailed to San Francisco, which the Chinese immigrants had named the "golden mountain."
 
Found by helpingnorth in Asian Immigrants
December 29, 2009 at 12:51 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 4153   
 
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Song of the U.S. Presidents
From schooltube.com, produced by lmclean (Teacher)
This teacher-made video has primary students singing a song carrying the names of the United States presidents. The video is best used as an example of what teachers can do to integrate music into a subject area. 
 
Found by freealan in Overview-All Presidents
November 14, 2011 at 09:03 PM
 
Ages: 3 - 8     License: Undetermined
 
Rating:  
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   Views: 4147   
 
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